Uncategorized

Internet History Technology Security Quiz

Internet History Technology Security Quiz Answer. In this post you will get Quiz Answer Of Internet History Technology Security

 

Internet History Technology Security Quiz

Offered By ”University of Michigan”

Enroll Now

Week- 1

History: Dawn of Electronic Computing

1.
Question 1
What was the Lorenz Machine used to transmit?

1 point

  • Long strategic messages with lots of detail
  • Attack plans between the British and Russian generals
  • Intelligence between the American and British forces
  • News stories from Germany to the soldiers at the front so they would feel more connected to family and friends back home

2.
Question 2
Who is John Forbes Nash and what is he known for?

1 point

  • An actor in the movie A Beautiful Mind
  • The creator of the internet
  • A famous spy during World War II
  • A mathematician and founder of modern day Game Theory

3.
Question 3
What did the Polish Cipher Bureau give to the British?

1 point

  • A German Geheimschreiber
  • A Polish dessert called the Bomba
  • Access to the Polish telephone network data transmissions
  • A technique for breaking encoded German Enigma messages

4.
Question 4
Why was the Enigma machine so important to the German strategy during World-War II?

1 point

  • Encrypted wireless communication allowed for a very fast and yet coordinated approach to war
  • Because Germany wanted to challenge the British to see who could build the first electronic computer
  • Because Germany’s enemies would be distracted if they believed all the mis-information in the communication
  • Because it was the quickest way to insure that as many people as possible would be exposed to propaganda messages.

5.
Question 5
What is a Modem used for?

1 point

  • Use a voice-based phone line to transmit data
  • Decrypt coded German war time transmissions
  • Insure that transmissions to submarines work even when they are deep under water
  • Record encrypted data from wireless transmissions for later decryption.
  • Retransmit lost packets so as to insure the overall reliability of Internet connections

6.
Question 6
What kind of parts were used to make the Colossus electronic computer?

1 point

  • Hardware that was in common use in telephone switching stations
  • All of the parts were made of wood because of a shortage of silicon to make computer chips
  • Microprocessors and random access memory
  • A gas turbine that drove an air compressor

7.
Question 7
What are leased lines?

1 point

  • Secure lines used to connect British cryptographers to British military command
  • The modern lines we connect to the internet through
  • Dedicated telephone lines organizations paid telecom companies monthly to have continuous access to

8.
Question 8
About how many vacuum valves/tubes were there in the Colossus?

1 point

  • 12
  • 2500
  • 10000
  • 150

9.
Question 9
On the Colossus computer what was used to store and repeatedly read the encrypted message text?

1 point

  • Strips of film
  • A spinning magnetic disk drive that was read like a tape
  • A paper tape that was read using light sensitive tubes
  • A solid-state flash drive (i.e. a USB stick)

10.
Question 10
What made Bletchley park successful?

1 point

  • The information provided by the Polish Cipher Bureau
  • Their huge team dedicated to the purpose of decryption
  • The unlimited budget available to them
  • All of the above

11.
Question 11
Who did the Enigma machine belong to?

1 point

  • The Norwegians
  • The British
  • The Polish
  • The Germans

12.
Question 12
Who created the functional design of the Bombe mechanical computer use to crack Enigma codes at Bletchley Park?

1 point

  • Alan Turing and Gordon Welchman
  • Max Newman and William (Bill) Tutte
  • Alistair Dennison and Tommy Flowers

13.
Question 13
Where is Bletchley Park located?

1 point

  • Sydney, Australia
  • New Mexico, United States
  • Glasgow, Scotland
  • Buckinghamshire, England

 

 

Week- 2

History: The First Internet – NSFNet

1.
Question 1
What was the primary reason for the development of store and forward networks by the academic community?

1 point

There were no leased lines available in the US

The phone company refused to provide leased lines to the academic community

Universities were willing to tolerate delay in order to keep the cost of long-distance data communication low

Wireless communications like 4G were much slower than the leased copper wires from the phone company

 

1.
Question 1
What was the primary reason for the development of store and forward networks by the academic community?

1 point

Due to a imited number of installed copper wires, transfer with leased lines was expensive

There were no leased lines available in the US

Leased lines were only available to businesses like banks

Wireless communications like 4G were much slower than the leased copper wires from the phone company

2.
Question 2
What is the relationship between the number of hops on the store and forward network, and the time taken for a message to be delivered?

1 point

More hops within the network usually result in a longer delivery time

The number of hops don’t matter because more hops means less traffic per hop

More hops in the network decrease delivery time

For each new hop in the network the delivery time always doubles

3.
Question 3
What were the primary motivations for the Department of Defense to develop the research network ARPANET?

1 point

To improve computing equipment for military purposes, making it easier for people to access computers, and communicate more effectively across the military.

Cisco was using the ARPANET to test the performance and reliability of its early products in the 1970’s and 1980’s

They knew that if they built the ARPANET during the 1970’s it would lay the groundwork for massive economic growth in the later 1990’s

There was a desire to make sure consumer hand-held devices would continue to function in case of nuclear war

4.
Question 4
What was the fundamental difference between the store and forward network of BITNET, and ARPANET?

1 point

The use of computer terminals

ARPANET was essentially a store-and-forward network for the U.S. Military

Packet switching

The use of leased lines from the telephone company

5.
Question 5
In the shared network, the role of the router is:

1 point

To store data when a network link went down

To store all of the possible routes between a pair of connected computers

To reassemble packets into the original message

To quickly forward packets to the next router

6.
Question 6
What are the advantages of packet switching?

1 point

Many messages can be in-flight at the same time, preventing large messages from blocking small ones

Packet switching slows all messages down to the speed of the slowest message

Packet switching makes sure every packet takes exactly the same path from the source computer to the destination computer

There is no major advantage and the decision to do packet switching was politically motivated

7.
Question 7
Why did the National Science Foundation decide to build a national shared network?

1 point

Cisco wanted someone to develop and test router technology so they could build a business around network hardware

It was very expensive to give each university its own supercomputer. A national shared network was more affordable.

Universities had extensive on-campus networks and needed a way to connect those networks together.

Politicians put pressure on the National Science Foundation to build a national shared network

8.
Question 8
Larry Smarr was one of many instrumental players in creating the first national network. What do we learn from his interview?

1 point

From the first moment that NSFNet was turned on, Google was the most popular application

That high performance computing needs at universities and the Internet were deeply connected

Telephone companies were very supportive of NSFNet.

Access to shared library resources (journals etc) were the primary motivator of the NSFNet

9.
Question 9
Why did the University of Michigan not participate in the ARPANET research project?

1 point

Michigan had its own state-wide network, consisting of 3 nodes

When Michigan first connected to ARPANET they crashed the network, and so were permanently removed from the project

No states starting with the letter ‘M’ were included

Michigan had its own state-wide network, consisting of 10 nodes

10.
Question 10
In the late 1980s, how did the first average citizens get Internet access?

1 point

First the ‘academic-only’ rules were quietly ignored and then later the ‘academic-only’ rules were removed completely

Average citizens could purchase Internet access commercially

Some citizens hacked into the network

ARPANET became the first Internet Service Provider (ISP) and sold access to the NSFNet

11.
Question 11
What was the primary difference between the University of Michigan proposal to build the NSFNet, and the other proposals?

1 point

The University of Michigan’s midwest location meant that the connections to the rest of the nodes on the NSF were cheaper.

The University of Michigan used leased lines from the telephone company. Other proposals used long-distance wireless communications to build the network.

The University of Michigan proposal proposed a 1.54 Mbit network with planned upgrades to much higher speeds throughout the life of the project

The University of Michigan proposal included a search engine. The other proposals only had a directory-style lookup of Web resources.

 

 

 

Week- 3

History: The Web Makes it Easy to Use

1.
Question 1
What was a common goal that the various innovators we’ve heard from were trying to achieve?

1 point

Make sure that their country was the only country with and effective communications infrastructure

Commercialize their innovations as quickly as possible before anyone came up with a better idea

Improve communication between people all across the world

Protect their ideas using patents so they would have an edge over other application developers

2.
Question 2
What did Robert Caillau see as a major strength of his web editor and browser as opposed to Gopher and ultimately Mosaic?

1 point

Each time you clicked a link the entire page replaced the previous page in the same window

It was much easier to install

It allowed for the development of graphically rich games

It handled links as connections as opposed to ‘ugly’ URLs

2.
Question 2
What did Robert Caillau see as a major strength of his web editor and browser as opposed to Gopher and ultimately Mosaic?

1 / 1 point

Each time you clicked a link the entire page replaced the previous page in the same window

It was much easier to install

It allowed for the development of graphically rich games

It opened each element in a new window

 

 

3.
Question 3
What does HTTP stand for?

1 point

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol

Helpful Text Typing Pattern

Haptic Type Transmit Pattern

4.
Question 4
In 1994-1995, Microsoft saw the Internet as such an important piece of the future that they devoted how many people to developing support for the Internet and Web into Windows-95?

1 point

2000

500

10000

5000

5.
Question 5
What best describes Robert Caillau’s vision for the World Wide Web?

1 point

A tool that would allow people to shop, connect with family and friends, and produce public logs of their daily lives

An interface that would allow academics to collaboratively create, edit, and view documentation, seeing each different type of material (maps, images, text, etc.) in its own particular individual window.

A system through which academics could discover research relevant to their field

6.
Question 6
Which of the following best describe how people used the web server developed by Paul Kunz?

1 point

As an early site to meet and converse with people around the world

As an early source of high-quality content

As a site to buy and sell items via auctions

As a bulletin board system where people discussed programming techniques for NeXT computers

7.
Question 7
What piece of technology had to be created for the web to be successful in 1994?

1 point

Wearable virtual reality glasses

Printers that could be used over wireless networks

Video cameras to allow low-cost video calls around the world

A protocol that allowed for the retrieval of documents stored on network-attached servers

8.
Question 8
During what time period was Gopher more popular than the Web?

1 point

Gopher was never more popular than the web

1990-1993

1994-1997

1980-1985

9.
Question 9
What is the markup language invented by Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau to represent web documents.

1 point

HTML

JSON

XML

Python

10.
Question 10
What problems were the team trying to develop NCSA Mosaic trying to solve? (check all that apply)

1 point

Teaching beginning Computer Science students how to develop web services

Creating a browser where all content popped up in a new window

Creating a browser that would let people view documents stored on the web

Creating a web browser that was easy to install

11.
Question 11
Who did Paul Kunz describe the modern implementation of the internet as being a “win-win” solution for? (Choose all that apply)

1 point

The Web is a win for telephone companies as it gives them a monopoly over long distance communications

The Web is a win for companies because it helps them reaching their target audience more directly

The Web is a win for everyday people as it allows them to do complex product comparisons effectively

12.
Question 12
Which of the following is true?

1 point

BITNet was a packet-switched network

Packet switched networks were widely used in higher-education before store-and-forward networks were deployed

One way of reducing cost on a store-and-forward network was to add another school geographically in-between two connected schools

When a link goes down in a store-and-forward network, data is re-routed in less than a second so users barely notice the outage

13.
Question 13
What did Steve Jobs contribute to the creation of the Internet?

1 point

He made sure that the first web browser from CERN was very easy to install and use by bundling it into the iPad

While in college, he created the browser that would ultimately be instrumental in making the Internet available to everyone.

He was responsible for the company that created the NeXT machine – and on which much of the most earliest development of the Internet was done.

He gave CERN a grant to write the software for the world-wide web.

He invented a new business model for music that ultimate created the need for the world-wide-web and Internet

14.
Question 14
Which of the following is not true about the CERN high-energy physics lab?

1 point

CERN has an annual music festival each summer called the Hardronic Festival

CERN has a need to communicate with scientists working at universities around the world

Many of the experiments at CERN take 10 or 20 years to build before they can be used to gather data

In 1987, they decided that inventing the Web was more important than studying Physics

15.
Question 15
In what year can we clearly say the World Wide Web took off?

1 point

1998

1988

1994

1991

16.
Question 16
What makes Switzerland an ideal location to house a multi-national collaborative research facility like CERN?

1 point

The beautiful and inspiring scenery

The fantastic food available to feed these brilliant minds

Switzerland’s longstanding neutrality allows scientists from all over the world to travel there more easily than other nations.

The flat landscape allows for the construction of large above-ground particle accelerators

17.
Question 17
What kinds of atmospheres do we consistently see as providing the right support to allow fantastic innovation to happen?

1 point

Top-down organizations that emphasize specific goals and standards, and refuse to allow their research to be distracted by new discoveries.

Organizations that support and encourage creativity in all forms – including music, art, and the pursuit of extensive side projects.

Organizations that offer financial bonuses to employees that produce innovations that transform society.

Government-run projects that use statistical approaches to process improvement reducing the average number of defects in each innovation.

 

 

Week- 4

History: Commercialization and Growth

1.
Question 1
What institution agreed to be responsible for web standards in 1994?

1 point

Stanford

Request-Response Congress (RRC)

HTML Standards Organization (HSO)

University of Michigan

CERN

World-Wide-Web Consortium (W3C)

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)

2.
Question 2
Between 1990 and 2006 the number of servers connected to the web grew from what to what?

1 point

3 servers to 100 thousand servers

1 server to 120 million servers

1 server to 1 billion servers

2 servers to 500 million servers

3.
Question 3
What browser did Netscape ultimately turn into?

1 point

Chrome

Safari

Internet Explorer

Firefox

4.
Question 4
How did the Mozilla foundation earn their money?

1 point

They charged end-users an upgrade fee to go from the free version of streaming video to the pro version

They had several Class A IP addresses which they split up and auctioned them and sold them to the highest bidder.

They added a search bar to their browser, and Google paid for the traffic directed to them.

They received a $10 million dollar endowment from Warren Buffet

5.
Question 5
What web technology does Brendan Eich include as part of creating the capabilities we refer to as HTML5?

1 point

Visual Basic

Ruby on Rails

CSS

PHP

6.
Question 6
Why did JavaScript never fail in the beginning, as most new programming languages do?

1 point

It was written by a team of 1000 computer scientists.

It was carefully crafted over the course of several years before being released.

It was written by someone who had prior experience constructing a language, and knew what pitfalls to avoid in creating the initial product.

They convened a conference with 100 computer scientists and had everyone vote on what features to include.

7.
Question 7
What was Mitchell Baker “fired” from Netscape for?

1 point

Because she added several badly-designed tags (like blink) to HTML without approval

For repeatedly giving priority to the needs of the open source community over the needs of the commercial version of Netscape.

For making the Netscape browser display a disrespectful pop-up message whenever it was viewing www.aol.com

For giving trade secrets to Microsoft

8.
Question 8
What was Tim Berners Lee’s goal with establishing web standards?

1 point

To insure that Netscape would be able to control the future directions of the web

To prevent the proprietary Balkanization of the web

To make sure the CERN browser was the only browser in the marketplace

To make sure that Facebook would be held accountable for their privacy policies

 

8.
Question 8
What was Tim Berners Lee’s goal with establishing web standards?

0 / 1 point

To make sure that all TCP/IP implementations used an appropriate retransmit timeout

To have total control over how programming for the web was done

To make sure that a single company could not determine the technical direction of the web

To make sure that all web browsers were also editors

 

 

9.
Question 9
Why did Jeff Bezos choose to start Amazon.com by selling books?

1 point

Books are the category of items that have the most different products, making it impossible to have a brick and mortar store with the same level of inventory.

Because Apple’s iTunes store had already cornered the market for music tracks

Because the ISBN number allowed each book to be broken into packets and routed across the network for remote printing

Books were the easiest item to track because of their ISBN catalogue numbers.

Books were the easiest category of items to ship.

 

 

Week- 5

Technology: Internets and Packets

1.
Question 1
Common Link Layer technologies are… (Choose all that apply)

1 point

Ethernet

Smartphones

Cable Modem

iPods

 

1.
Question 1
Common Link Layer technologies are… (Choose all that apply)

0 / 1 point

VCRs

HDTVs

Cable Modem

DSL

 

 

2.
Question 2
When do wireless devices receive their serial numbers (i.e. MAC or Ethernet addresses)?

1 point

When they are manufactured

Every time they connect to the internet

These numbers are assigned to individual people, and every device they own has the same number

When they pair with a wireless router

3.
Question 3
What does the time taken for a packet to reach a destination usually reflect?

1 point

How large the total message or data element is

The type of data the packet makes up

How much the individual user sending the information has paid for their internet connection

The speed of light and the distance the packet has to travel

4.
Question 4
How do wireless devices operating on a shared network determine when to send information so as not to incur chaos?

1 point

There is only one link to the network, and only one wireless device can connect at a time, so they are physically prevented from sending information unless it is their turn.

They listen to the sound on the current network, and send information when it is quiet.

They send requests to all other devices on the network, and wait to receive permission before transmitting data.

They chart energy usage, and send information when the numbers are low

5.
Question 5
What is the concern when deciding which device sends information next on Ethernet?

1 point

Discouraging the sending of large messages by delaying their transmission in favor of smaller, faster messages

Ensuring fairness – that one type of device, data, or user is not preferred over others.

Prioritizing the customers who purchase premium internet plans

Sending the most urgent emails before less important messages (like Farmville notifications)

6.
Question 6
What is the maximum possible number of hops a packet can take to try to reach their destination (the so-called “Time To Live” functionality of packets)?

1 point

255

4

150

500

7.
Question 7
What are Router Tables?

1 point

Huge banks of routers, housed by Google, that direct Internet traffic

An electrically enhanced table that, when you place a router on it, will increase your network speed

Dynamic lists of directions for where and how to direct packets

A linked trio of routers that manages incoming, outgoing, and within-network data transmissions.

8.
Question 8
What are the layers, and in what order do we structure them?

1 point

Link Layer

Map Layer

Social Media Layer

Application Layer

Transport Layer

Packet Layer

Visual Layer

Link Layer

Application Layer

Transport Layer

Internetwork Layer

Link Layer

Internetwork Layer

Application Layer

Link Layer

Transport Layer

9.
Question 9
What is the Internet Protocol Layer responsible for?

1 point

Managing the order of data transmission from multiple computers on a wireless network

Being 100% reliable

Getting a packet to a specific network address

Moving the packet onto the link

10.
Question 10
How is an IP address determined?

1 point

According to product manufacturing date

Geographically

By the date in which the owner first got an email account

By the hour in which the computer was most recently turned on

11.
Question 11
The prefix of an IP address determines what?

1 point

The brand of computer

The owner of the computer

The default web browser installed

The network that it belongs to

12.
Question 12
What is the Link Layer responsible for?

1 point

Deciding on the next link that a packet should be sent on once it is inside of a router

Assigning domain names like www.coursera.org

Storing each packet until it has been acknowledged for delivery

One single hop

 

12.
Question 12
What is the Link Layer responsible for?

0 / 1 point

Reporting which packets successfully arrived at their destination

Deciding on the next link that a packet should be sent on once it is inside of a router

Assigning domain names like www.coursera.org

Pulling the data from a single link

 

 

13.
Question 13
Is it possible to track a packet’s journey across the network?

1 point

Yes, using a technique called ‘traceroute’ which tracks the packets that are returned due to transmission failure.

Yes, using RIP (Router Information Protocol) which tracks the packets that successfully arrive at their destination.

No, packets cannot be tracked.

Yes, using a service called ‘packetfind’ that tracks the transmission of all packets across the Internet.

 

 

 

Week- 6

Technology: Transport Control Protocol (TCP)

1.
Question 1
What part of data transfer does TCP solve, and what part does IP solve?

1 point

The interface via which a user sends data, and the reliability of data transmissions

The actual movement of the data, and the reliability of data transmissions

The reliability of data transmissions, and the security of the data.

The reliability of data transmissions, and the actual movement of the data

2.
Question 2
What is window size in regards packet transfer?

1 point

The amount of data that can be sent before receiving an acknowledgement

The maximum number of packets belonging to an email or file uploaded to the internet

The size of the interface window a user sees on the screen and sends packets through

The range of hours during the day that low-speed data is free on the Internet

3.
Question 3
What was the problem that Van Jacobson experienced and worked to solve?

1 point

Having his secure data stolen during transmission

Extremely slow transmission of data when two fast internal networks were connected via a slow network.

Getting messages intended for other people

Receiving partial and indecipherable sets of postcards in the mail

4.
Question 4
The storage of unacknowledged data is whose responsibility?

1 point

The person sending the data

The application layer of the sending computer

The transport layer of the sending computer

The link layer of the receiving computer

Routers

5.
Question 5
How did Van Jacobson change TCP so that it would work properly?

1 point

He changed the receiving computer to acknowledge data that had not yet been received

He changed the sending computer to start sending data slowly and speed up as the data was acknowledged

He changed the sending computer to send all of its data to the first router before any packets were sent across the slow link

He changed routers to compress data when sending it across slow links.

6.
Question 6
What do we learn from the four layer TCP about how to solve complex problems?

1 point

Generally all software works best when it is broken into quarters with 1/4 of the problem assigned to equal sized teams.

Applications like word processors need a Link and Transport layer

Break things up into smaller pieces, and allow many different people and organizations to tackle each piece indvidually.

Complex architecture diagrams help sell products to non-technical management staff

7.
Question 7
If you listened closely to the Bob Metcalfe video, he mentioned that Ethernet was designed after the early ARPANET had been designed and knowing how ARPANET would work allowed him to greatly simplify the design of Ethernet. What problem did the first implementation of Ethernet at PARC assume would be solved at a higher level of the network architecture.

1 point

How to detect if electrical interference on the ethernet cable caused the data in a packet to be corrupted

Retransmitting lost or damaged packets

What address would be assigned to each device order to share the Ethernet cable

How to deal with two computers attempting to start transmitting data at exactly the same time and corrupting each other’s data

8.
Question 8
When we talk of the protocols that move data over the Internet, we talk of TCP/IP. Which of the following is FALSE about TCP/IP:

1 point

TCP will retransmit data if it is lost in the Internet

TCP demands that data be stored in the sending computer until it is acknowledged

IP makes use of TCP as its underlying transport mechanism

TCP is a stream of bytes

9.
Question 9
In TCP, when does a sending system know it is safe to discard packets after it has sent them?

1 point

As soon as the sending computer has in IP address that came from DHCP

After the packet has successfully made it across the first hop

After it has received an acknowledgement from the receiving system.

As soon as the packet has a properly assigned IP address

10.
Question 10
If you wanted to register the domain dr-chuck.go.com – who would you contact?

1 point

The owner of dr-chuck.com

The IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force)

The owner of go.com

Jon Postel – Because he was the “numbers guy” in the ARPANET

11.
Question 11
Which of the following is a domain name?

1 point

www.umich.edu

00:1f:5b:81:62:e7

(734) 615-2000

192.168.0.12

 

11.
Question 11
When looking at addresses from most general to most specific, we read IP addresses ________ and we read domain addresses _________. (fill in the blanks)

1 point

left to right, right to left

top to bottom, bottom to top

right to left, left to right

right to left, right to left

 

 

Week- 7

Technology: Application Protocols

1.
Question 1
What does the Application Layer expect from the Transport Layer?

1 point

The Transport layer dynamically transports IP addresses to all of the computers connected to a Wifi Network.

A reliable pipe that delivers data from another application across the Internet

The Transport Layer tells the Application Layer the geographic location of all of the routers in the Internet

The Application sends a Domain name through the Transport Layer and gets back an IP Address

The Transport Layer accurately predicts the number of hops it will take to go across the country.

2.
Question 2
If you were “hacking” the Hypertext Transport Protocol using the ‘telnet’ command, what command would you send to the web server once you are connected to retrieve a document?

1 point

DNLD/DOC

GET

DOCU-RETR

RETR

3.
Question 3
Which of the following are examples of applications in the application layer? (Choose all that apply)

1 point

Chrome web browser

WiFi

Internet Explorer

Ethernet Port

Central Processing Unit

 

3.
Question 3
Which of the following are examples of applications in the application layer? (Choose all that apply)

1 point

WiFi

Ethernet Port

Slow Start

Apple Mail

Instant Messaging Client

 

3.
Question 3
Which of the following are examples of applications in the application layer? (Choose all that apply)

1 point

Chrome web browser

Microsoft Outlook

Ethernet port

Fiber Optic

Router

 

 

4.
Question 4
When is the Internet 100% up and working?

1 point

At midnight GMT, every day all routers reboot and the Internet is 100% up for about ten minutes

Once a year the Internet is completely rebooted and stays at 100% for about ten minutes

It never is. It is constantly having pieces connect, fail, disconnect, reboot, etc.

When more than 2% of the Internet goes down, all routers simultaneously reboot to get back to 100%

5.
Question 5
Last time! What are the layers of the internet, and the order in which we structure them?

1 point

* Application

* Router

* Link

* IP

* Port

* Transport

* Application

* Link

* Application

* Transport

* IP

* Link

* User

* Application

* Link

* Router

6.
Question 6
What does the browser do when you click a Hypertext Link from your current web page to another web page?

1 point

It does a relational database look up in the IMDB

It does a Request-Response Cycle

It connects to port 23 and sends the “DATA” command

It looks at its most recent RSS feed for the Domain Name Service and selects a Network Number

7.
Question 7
What does port 23 do?

1 point

IMAP

HTTP

Telnet (Login)

YouTube

8.
Question 8
What does port 80 do?

1 point

HTTP

SMTP

POP

Telnet (login)

9.
Question 9
RFCs are:

1 point

The standards defining protocols on the Internet

Curated by Paul Kunz at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)

Papers written by Physicists at CERN about Radio Frequency Colliders

Issued by the United Nations (UN)

10.
Question 10
Which of the following is most like a TCP/IP port number:

1 point

Telephone extension

Zip Code

Highway number

Telephone area code

11.
Question 11
What is a protocol?

1 point

A program used to scan for vulnerable ports on a network-connected computer

A technique for obscuring security algorithms

A technique routers use to predict the traffic distribution over a long time period

A set of rules that govern how different components of the Internet interact with each other

 

 

Week- 8

Security : Encrypting and Signing

1.
Question 1
Which of the following is true of security?

1 point

Perfect security is achievable and cheap

Perfect security is unachievable and requires a trade-off with cost

Perfect security is unachievable but you should always choose the most expensive option

Perfect security is achievable but expensive

2.
Question 2
What is the difference between active and passive wiretapping?

1 point

In passive wiretapping only some of the network data is altered where in active wiretapping all of the network data is altered

Passive wiretapping and active wiretapping are different names for network snooping

In active wiretapping the network is snooped whereas in passive wiretapping the network is altered

In passive wiretapping the network is snooped whereas in active wiretapping the network data is altered

3.
Question 3
Integrity is preserved if

1 point

Information you receive is from who you think it is

The information you receive has not been corrupted since it was sent no matter who sent it

The information you receive is probably from who you think it is and has not been modified since it was sent

The information you receive is from who you think it is and has not been modified since it was sent

4.
Question 4
Which of the following factors has the smallest effect on the strength of a cryptosystem?

1 point

The key distribution technique

The encryption algorithm

The key length

The data being transmitted

5.
Question 5
What is one possible advantage of public-key cryptosystems over secret-key ones?

1 point

Public-key cryptosystems do not have the problem of secure key distribution

Public-key cryptosystems are always more secure than secret-key ones

Public-key cryptosystems can transmit more data than secret-key ones

6.
Question 6
What does it mean if a cryptosystem is symmetric-key in nature?

1 point

The key used for encryption is a shortened version of the key used for decryption

The key used for encryption is the backward version of the key used for decryption

The key used for encryption is the from the key used for decryption but with a shared secret added to the end

The key used for encryption is the same as the key used for decryption

7.
Question 7
The following question is encrypted using a Caesar Cipher with a shift of 13. You can use www.rot13.com to decrypt the question.

Jub vf perqvgrq nf orvat bar bs gur vairagbef bs Rgurearg?

1 point

Bob Metcalfe

Mitchell Baker

Vint Cerf

Tim Berners-Lee

8.
Question 8
The following question is encrypted using a Caesar Cipher with a shift of 13. You can use www.rot13.com to decrypt the question and answers.

Jung qbrf gur Gjvggre unfugnt #VUGF fgnaq sbe?

1 point

Vagrearg Uvfgbel, Grpuabybtl, naq Frphevgl

Vagreaangvbany Uvtu Grpuabybtl Fheirl

Vagreany Uvtu Grpuabybtl Fbyhgvba

Vaqvtb, Uraan, Gnatrevar naq Fhasybjre

9.
Question 9
What is the SHA-1 hash of the string below as computed by http://www.dr-chuck.com/sha1.php

The Transport Layer does retransmission

1 point

7024bcb8830521399edc7e55f7be8dbc7722e179

7e55f7be8dbc7024bcb8830527722e1791399edc

1399edc7e55f7be8dbc7024bcb8830527722e179

22e1791399edc7e55f7be8dbc7024

10.
Question 10
What does a cryptographic hash function do?

1 point

It computes the Hyperbolic Asymmetric Sine Harmonic (H.A.S.H.) for a sequence of audio data

It takes a block of data and randomly changes characters to numbers

It converts input fixed-size bit strings into blocks of data

It takes a block of data and returns a fixed-size bit string called the hash value

11.
Question 11
What critical element does simple digest-based Message Signing, as described in the lecture, depend upon?

1 point

The message must be under 20 characters long

The secret should not be longer than the message

The sharing of a secret transported securely ‘out of band’

The geographic proximity of the transmitter and recipient of the message

12.
Question 12
What is the problem with secret key distribution via the internet?

1 point

The communication of the secret key is insecure

The internet is too slow for sending keys

There is no problem

The internet cannot handle the length of shared secret keys because they are longer than a single packet

13.
Question 13
You are going to send the message below using shared secret of IHTS. Use http://www.dr-chuck.com/sha1.php to compute your message digest using the technique from lecture. What will the first six characters of the digest/signature that you send along with the message?

Be sure to drink more Ovaltine

1 point

44dbc4

2b5473

e1c85e

8b4258

14.
Question 14
Select the valid signed message from Annie if your shared secret is IHTS? Use http://www.dr-chuck.com/sha1.php to compute your message digests using the technique from lecture. Only the first 6 characters of the SHA1 message digest are shown below.

1 point

Meet me at the train station87fd2e

Bring me cookies51be4e

Send money please7d47f3d4

It is raining5e4421

 

14.
Question 14
Select the valid signed message from Annie if your shared secret is IHTS? Use http://www.dr-chuck.com/sha1.php to compute your message digests using the technique from lecture. Only the first 6 characters of the SHA1 message digest are shown below.

0 / 1 point

Meet me at the train station87fd2e

Send money please7d47f3d4

Bring me cookies51be4e

I have not been kidnapped by pirates32f4d3

 

 

14.
Question 14
Select the valid signed message from Annie if your shared secret is IHTS? Use http://www.dr-chuck.com/sha1.php to compute your message digests using the technique from lecture. Only the first 6 characters of the SHA1 message digest are shown below.

1 / 1 point

Everything is all right7dd244

Meet me at the train station87fd2e

It is raining5e4421

Send money please7d47f3d4

 

 

 

Week- 9

Security: Web Security

1.
Question 1
Which of the following is false about the two keys used in public key encryption?

1 point

The public key alone is used for encryption and the private key alone is used for decryption

The public key is openly revealed while the private key must be kept secret

If you have the public key it is easy to compute the private key

One key is public and the other is private

2.
Question 2
When you are using secure http and sending data between your computer and your bank’s computer, where is the data encrypted and decrypted?

1 point

Encrypted in your network card and decrypted by the bank’s Internet Service Provider (ISP)

Encrypted in your bank’s computer before they store the data in a database

Encrypted and decrypted each time your message passes through a router

Encrypted in your computer and decrypted in the bank’s computer

3.
Question 3
In regards to security, what do we assume about the Internet?

1 point

That no one can view Internet traffic without a subpoena

That neither the routers nor the links between the routers are secure

No one should ever send sensitive information like Credit Card numbers over the Internet

That the entire Internet is completely secure other than WiFi connections

4.
Question 4
This week we’ve updated our model of how we communicate information via the internet to add in a fifth mini-layer to the structure in order to protect the confidentiality of transmissions. What is the new list of layers and in what order do we list them?

1 point

* Application

* TCP

* IP

* Packet Encryption

* Link

* Application

* Secure Sockets

* TCP

* IP

* Link

* ZIP+Secure

* Application

* TCP

* IP

* Link

* Application

* TCP

* IP

* Link

* Dark Fiber

5.
Question 5
What is packet sniffing?

1 point

When a router looks at the first part of packet to to the routing lookup before the entire packet is received

When we use detection equipment to see if link speeds are being exceeded

When a receiving system anticipates a packet before it is received and pre-sends the acknowledgement to save time

Computers watching packets being transmitted across the network in hopes of finding important or valuable data

6.
Question 6
Which of the following is FALSE about using secure sockets (i.e. https) to send sensitive information like a credit card across the Internet?

1 point

When using an unsecured WiFi, your data is still protected because of https

It requires large amounts of computing power to decrypt your data

It is impossible to decrypt your data

It requires complex math to decrypt your data

7.
Question 7
Which of the following is NOT a major threat to your data when using secure sockets?

1 point

Someone may see your public key

You can be unknowingly redirected to a server different from the one you would like

There may be a virus on your computer monitoring your keystrokes

8.
Question 8
Which of the following is not an equivalent name to ‘digital certificate’?

1 point

Identity certificate

Digital certificate

Private key certificate

Public key certificate

9.
Question 9
What is a digital certificate?

1 point

An electronic document used to give a public key an identity

An electronic document used to give a private key an identity

A real-life document used to certify the security of your computer

An electronic document used to give both public and private keys an identity

10.
Question 10
What is a certificate authority?

1 point

An entity that tries to ensure secure transactions by attempting to crack encrypted messages online

An entity that certifies the ownership of a public key by the named subject of the certificate

An entity that certifies that you have no virus on your computer

An entity that certifies the mathematical relationship between the public and private keys of a system

11.
Question 11
Which of the following is NOT an indicator of the effectiveness of Verisign as a certificate authority?

1 point

Verisign goes to great lengths to store their private keys securely

Verisign has a high success rate for maintaining secure transactions

Verisign publishes its private keys on a little-known web site only available to key owners

Verisign is used by major manufacturers like Apple and Microsoft

12.
Question 12
How does your computer typically know the public key of a certificate authority during secure communications?

1 point

The public key is stored in the operating system by the manufacturer before you buy or install it

The computer doesn’t use a public key

The public key is emailed to the computer the first time you switch it on

The public key has to be downloaded when you are setting up the computer’s web browser

 

 

Week- 10

Final Exam – IHTS

 

1.
Question 1
How did the top-secret computing technologies developed at Bletchley Park during World-War II impact computing technology after the war:

1 point

The plans for the computers at Bletchley Park were inadvertently leaked onto the Internet

The computer scientists used their knowledge of electronic computers to build the first generation of general purpose computers

All of the computing equipment was shipped to CERN where is was stored underground beneath the border between Switzerland and France

All the equipment at Bletchley Park was given to University College London(UCL) as part of a grant

One of the computer scientists at Bletchley Park anonymously wrote a tell-all book that described secret technologies in great detail

2.
Question 2
What did Alan Turing contribute to Computer Science?

1 point

He founded the field of Artificial Intelligence

He developed the slow-start algorithm for TCP

He developed the Domain Name System that looks up IP addresses

He helped design the IEEE 802.11 protocols that we now know as “WiFi”

He designed the first object-oriented programming language

3.
Question 3
What was the primary reason the Colossus computer was faster than the BOMBE computer?

1 point

The Colossus computer sharded its databases across multiple servers to improve throughput

The Colossus added cache memory to speed up instruction fetch

The Colossus computer used vacuum tubes instead or gears and relays

The Colossus computer submerged its bearings in oil to allow it to spin four times faster

The Colossus computer used Flash RAM rather than spinning disk drives

4.
Question 4
Which of the following was the greatest weakness of store-and-forward networks like BITNET?

1 point

Since it made extensive use of WiFi, it experienced significant outages due to weather

Because messages were broken into small pieces and sent individually, buffer overflow caused too many retransmissions

Every new university that was added cost a lot of money because everyone needed a direct connection to the new university

IP addresses were geographical in nature but extremely difficult for users to keep track of

If your message was behind a large message it would have to wait until the large message was completed before it was sent.

5.
Question 5
Which of the following is most like a “packet” on the Internet?

1 point

A three-ring binder

The intersection of two roads

A cell phone antenna

A postcard

A restaurant

6.
Question 6
What was the original “stated” intention of the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNet)?

1 point

To provide a communications infrastructure for the World-Wide-Web

To increase the speed of E-Mail between universities

To allow universities to switch to IP telephony to save per-office charges

To connect scientists to supercomputers

To increase the demand for telephone company services

7.
Question 7
Given the original five-year and 15 million dollar budget of the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNet), what was the expected speed of the national NSFNet backbone?

1 point

56 thousand bits per second

45 million bits per second

1 billion bits per second

1.5 million bits per second

3 billion bits per second

8.
Question 8
Which of the following is the best explanation as to why the web was invented at CERN?

1 point

CERN was in possession of all of the top-secret communications equipment from Bletchley Park

At a 1985 IETF meeting in Columbus, Ohio the delegates agreed that CERN should invent the web

The French government passed a law that all documents needed to be online by 1993

Being in Switzerland ensured that the project managers paid very close attention to detail

Well-funded smart people in a culture that was open and fun

9.
Question 9
Which of the following is something that Robert Cailliau and Tim Berners-Lee did not do?

1 point

Invented the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)

Invented the first HTML editor

Invented the first web browser

Invented the first object-oriented language (WWW++)

Invented the Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP)

10.
Question 10
Where was the first web server in America in production on December 12, 1991?

1 point

Harvard University

University of Michigan

Princeton University

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)

National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at University of Illinois

11.
Question 11
What protocol was commonly used during 1990-1993 to organize and find information on the Internet that did not use the world-wide-web protocols?

1 point

RTSP

Altavista

Yahoo!

Wikipedia

Gopher

12.
Question 12
Which of the following products could be thought of as the “early ancestor of the Mozilla Firefox browser”?

1 point

Internet Explorer

Cello

NCSA Mosaic

Apple Safari

Opera

13.
Question 13
Where was JavaScript developed at?

1 point

Google

Sun Microsystems

Netscape

University of Illinois

Microsoft

14.
Question 14
What is the purpose of the World-Wide-Web Consortium?

1 point

Define standards for the web and avoid proprietary balkanization of the web

Developed privacy policies for Internet traffic that crossed international boundaries

Define protocol documents for the IP and Link layers

Act as a clearing house for open source software contributed by large corporations

Ensured that traffic between any two nodes on the Internet would never need more than 15 hops

15.
Question 15
Why was the first product sold by Amazon books?

1 point

Because there would be great demand for new technology books fueled by the growth of the Internet

Because there are over 3 million books in print

Because books were increasingly being purchased on e-readers like the Kindle

Because books are the easiest product to covert to digital form for electronic distribution

16.
Question 16
Which of the following is most similar to an Internet router?

1 point

A post card

A license plate number for an automobile

A truck

A string between two tin cans

A train station

17.
Question 17
About how many separate physical connections (i.e. hops) will a packet cross on the Internet as it goes from University of Michigan to Stanford University?

1 point

15

1

64

6

36

18.
Question 18
What is the value of a layered network model?

1 point

It makes sure that at least one layer is working so internet data never stops flowing completely

It allows for the detection of security breaches at the lower layers before they get through all the layers

It allows a complex design problem to be broken into smaller manageable parts

It insures that the Internet is capable of replacing the telephone networks around the world

It makes sure that university programmers and commercial programmers will not work on overlapping areas of the Internet

19.
Question 19
What is the IETF?

1 point

It establishes policies for the pricing for domain names around the world

It monitors traffic levels on network links that go between countries to insure that costs are evenly shared

It accumulates data packets that are lost due to congestion and returns them to the system that originally sent the data

It is a coordinating body where the standards that define the inner workings of the Internet are developed and published

It is the protocol that web browsers use to retrieve documents from web servers

20.
Question 20
Which is the lowest layer in the TCP/IP network model?

1 point

Transport

Internet

Application

Link

Proto-Application

21.
Question 21
Which of the following is a Link Layer address?

1 point

www.coursera.org

http://www.umich.edu/

192.168.0.12

2012-99-99

00:1f:5b:81:62:e7

22.
Question 22
Which of the following is *not* an attribute of the Internet (IP) Layer?

1 point

It moves data across a series of hops

It routes packets based on their network number

It is designed to recover lost packets

23.
Question 23
What is the purpose of the TTL value in an IP packet?

1 point

It ensures that a packet does not get stuck in an infinite loop in the Internet

It makes sure that we can use easy to read addresses like www.coursera.org

It records the network number of the next router that will forward the packet

It makes sure that the same packet is never sent twice

It compensates for lost packets by retransmitting them after a time period expires

24.
Question 24
Which of the following is a domain name?

1 point

00:1f:5b:81:62:e7

www.coursera.org

http://www.umich.edu/

192.168.0.12

25.
Question 25
What problem did Van Jacobson solve in TCP?

1 point

He created the domain name system to allow us to find an IP address for a domain name efficiently

He added compression to the link layer, greatly increasing throughput of the Internet

He made sure that commercial web traffic like Netflix would get higher priority than academic traffic or long file downloads

He invented the slow-start algorithm to keep systems from overloading a slow link

He added encryption so it was safe to move credit card information across the Internet

26.
Question 26
When we talk of the protocols that move data over the Internet, we talk of TCP/IP. Which of the following is FALSE about TCP/IP?

1 point

TCP will retransmit data if it is lost in the Internet

IP provides “best effort” delivery of network packets

IP makes use of TCP as its underlying transport mechanism

TCP provides reliable messaging where data arrives in order

TCP is a stream of bytes

27.
Question 27
Secure TCP (TLS) is between which two layers?

1 point

Link and Media

Transport and Internet

Router and Link

Application and Transport

Internet and Link

28.
Question 28
When you are using secure http and sending data between your computer and your bank’s computer, where is the data encrypted and decrypted?

1 point

Encrypted by your keyboard and decrypted by the disk drive in the bank’s computer

Encrypted and decrypted each time your message passes through a router

Encrypted in your computer and decrypted in the bank’s computer

Encrypted in your network card and decrypted by the bank’s Internet Service Provider (ISP)

Encrypted by your Internet Service Provider (ISP) and decrypted in the bank’s ISP

29.
Question 29
Which of the following is a TCP port (such as port 80 for HTTP) most like?

1 point

A train car

A telephone extension

A train station

A license plate number for an automobile

A country code for a telephone number

30.
Question 30
Which of the following commands is part of the Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP)?

1 point

RETR

PREFS

SAVE_AS

PING

GET

31.
Question 31
What is the problem with secret key distribution via the internet?

1 point

Sending secret-key data crashed early routers and so it was banned after 1978

Secret keys used a special character set that was not supported by TCP/IP

We cannot all physically visit every web site and physically pick up a key book to work securely with that site

There is no problem – you just send all the secret keys across the internet in plain text

Because secret keys were mostly numbers, they cause the Van Jacobson Algorithm to fail (slow start)

32.
Question 32
What does a cryptographic hash function do?

1 point

It breaks long messages into smaller pieces (hashes) to allow for effective sharing of a link layer

It determines the resonant frequency of digitized audio

It takes non-printable data and makes it 8-bit clean

It takes a block of data and computes a fixed-size bit string called the hash value

33.
Question 33
Which of the following is credited as one of the inventors of Public Key Cryptograhy in the 1970’s?

1 point

Whitfield Diffie

Bob Mercalfe

Mitchell Baker

Katie Hafner

34.
Question 34
Which historical figure is credited with encrypting military messages using a simple “shifted alphabet”?

1 point

Caesar

Archimedes

Plato

Nostradamus

35.
Question 35
Which of the following are the steps to sign and send a message to insure that the message came from the sender and was not modified in transit?

1 point

Compute the cryptographic hash of the secret and send the message + the hash across the internet.

Compute the cryptographic hash of the message, send the message + the hash + secret across the internet

Append the shared secret to the message, compute the cryptographic hash of the message + secret, send the message + cryptographic hash across the internet

Send the secret across the internet, receive the cryptographic hash from the other system and then send the message + cryptographic across the Internet

36.
Question 36
Which of the following statements is false

1 point

A public key can be sent across an insecure medium

Public key encryption is very difficult to break

It is not a problem if a public key is revealed to an eavesdropper

Public key encryption cannot be broken

37.
Question 37
What is the mathematical underpinnings of public key encryption?

1 point

Trignometry

Linear Algebra

Prime numbers

Turing Machines

Calculus

Venn Diagrams

38.
Question 38
Considering the four-layer TCP/IP model, which two layers does Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) fit between?

1 point

TCP and IP

Application and TCP

TCP and Link

IP and Link

39.
Question 39
If you are sending credit card information from a coffee shop WiFi to an Internet web site and later you find your credit card information has been stolen, which is the most likely scenario as to how your information was stolen?

1 point

You did not use secure HTTP (https) at a coffee shop with an open WiFi

Someone gained access to the database on the vendor’s web site and found all the credit cards

Someone gained access to all the packets passing through the Internet Service Provider used by the coffee shop

Someone guessed your credit card information by trying all possible 16-digit number sequences

40.
Question 40
Which of the following would be major a warning sign that indicates lax security practices when dealing with a site where you have an ID and Password?

1 point

They can send you a mail message with the password you previously used to log in if you forget it

They use public / private key encryption for all the web transactions

If you lose your password, you are forced to select a new password

They use Captcha (where you have to type in hard-to-read text) as part of their log in process

 

 

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *