Uncategorized

Introduction to UI Design Coursera

Introduction to UI Design Coursera Answer. In this post you will get Quiz & Assignment Answer Of Introduction to UI Design Coursera

 

Introduction to UI Design Coursera

Offered By ”University of Minnesota”

Enroll Now

Week- 1

Intro to UI Design: Introduction and Overview

 

1.
Question 1

The video that introduced the idea of Hall of Fame and Hall of Shame interfaces included a few pieces of design wisdom. Which of the following are true? (Select all that apply)

1 point

  • Written instructions in any user interface are a sign of bad design.
  • Simple things should be simple to use.
  • Responding to a user’s action with multiple types of subtle visual feedback is a good design strategy.
  • The design principle of Visibility is relevant for both computer interfaces and physical objects.

2.
Question 2

Suppose you are re-designing an application, and you have access to usage data from the current application that shows a particular command is not used frequently. Which of the following responses or actions is best supported by this usage data?

1 point

  • Create a keyboard shortcut for the command so that anyone who does want to use it can do so quickly and easily.
  • Remove the command from the application. It will simplify the application and make it easy to learn.
  • Do not include a button for this item in the main menu bar — it’s not worth devoting lots of space to an infrequently used option.
  • Come up with a new and more appealing name for the command so users will use the command more frequently.

3.
Question 3
Suppose you are designing a book search feature for children. What is one relevant lesson learned from the International Children’s Digital Library project?

1 point

  • Children may want to search for a book based on its length, its characters, or the color of its cover.
  • You may assume that a knowledgeable adult will be helping the child with your interface.
  • Make sure to include cartoon characters to engage the child.
  • Children typically search for books by typing in the name of the author or the title.

4.
Question 4
Suppose you are designing a socio-technical system (i.e., a social system operating on a technical base). What are relevant lessons learned from Airbnb and Couchsurfing? Please select all answers that apply.

1 point

  • Good design should reflect and reinforce the purpose of the system.
  • Make sure to include price information on the landing page.
  • Although both Airbnb and Couchsurfing provide beds for travelers, the interface of Airbnb reinforces the idea that Airbnb is a platform for people to find place to stay over; while couchsurfing successfully builds an environment where people find other people to stay with.
  • People always want to see other users’ personal information like their age and gender in a socio-technical system.

5.
Question 5
User interface design draws from many disciplines. Which of the following triples best reflects the core disciplines that UI Design draws from?

1 point

  • Computer Graphics (e.g., rendering and visualization); Computer Networking (e.g,, Internet protocols); and Computer Algorithms (e.g., complexity)
  • Technology (e.g., computer science); Ethics (e.g., philosophy); and Economics (e.g., supply/demand)
  • Statistics; Signal Processing; and Machine Learning
  • Design (e.g., industrial design); Technology (e.g., computer science); and Understanding Humans (e.g., psychology)

6.
Question 6
What UI Design principle was illustrated by the case study that examined the death of an elderly person routed to a dangerous favela in Brazil?

1 point

  • Make sure in-car interfaces can be operated without requiring the driver’s hands or visual attention.
  • Prevent errors by eliminating error-prone conditions or checking for them and requiring users to confirm before committing.
  • Never allow a user to travel into a dangerous neighborhood.
  • Always be sure all of the options in your interface have visible controls.

7.
Question 7
Which of these lessons (drawn from the TurboTax and StubHub case studies) best reflects an opportunity for successful user interface design?

1 point

  • Users are delightfully surprised if you hide data and reveal it at the end (e.g., tax refund or ticket fees).
  • People generally trust computers with their personal financial data like taxes or credit cards.
  • Any activity involving money can be made better with a web-based interface.
  • Find processes people find hard or painful and make them easier.

8.
Question 8
Why do we focus on case studies and hall of fame/hall of shame examples?

1 point

  • It makes us feel better to see that others design badly, and inspires us when others design well.
  • If we notice good and bad designs and reason about what makes them good or bad, we can learn principles about design that can help us design better interfaces ourselves.
  • The last key part of UI Design is evaluation, and it works just as well to evaluate others’ interfaces as to evaluate your own.
  • Looking at good and bad interfaces is a way of learning about users, which we know is an important part of UI Design.

9.
Question 9
Anton Yelchin (the Star Trek actor) died in an accident that has been
attributed to a poor gear shift design. What was the problem and how
could it have been avoided.

1 point

  • The gear shift didn’t actually work; a warning light should have indicated it was broken
  • The gear shift moved between forward and reverse to easily, killing the engine; the carmaker could have put in an interlock.
  • The gear shift didn’t have a park setting; the carmaker should have included one rather than relying on the user turning off the car.
  • The gear shift worked differently from usual and didn’t physically reflect the current gear; the carmaker could have used existing standard interfaces.

10.
Question 10
In the case study looking at the Citibank ATM design, what conclusion could you draw about the banks that had deployed ATMs that caused customers to stop using them by eating their cards:

1 point

  • They didn’t understand how to take the fact that people came in upset about eaten cards and use that to change the design of the ATMs to fix the problem.
  • They never realized that people had problems with the ATMs.
  • The bank employees were just like their customers and therefore completely understood how their customers felt.
  • They deliberately wanted customers to be unhappy since using ATMs cost the banks too much money.

 

 

Week- 2

Task/Scenario Evaluation #1

 

1.
Question 1
OK, This is your first “training” evaluation of a Task and Scenario Description. First things first, please be sure you have Sample Task and Scenario #1 open (in another tab or window) as you complete this quiz.

The structure of this quiz will mirror the evaluation of task and scenario descriptions in the peer review assignment, together with our recommended answers and commentary.

Don’t worry if at first you are a little off from our evaluations; the first examples are primarily for training. As you do more examples, you should get better at evaluating tasks and scenarios.

Does the response contain a task-description for a task that would
make sense when considering what a retail customer might want to do?

1 point

Yes

No

2.
Question 2
To what extent is the task described clearly in a way that a user of
an online shopping site could be given it as instructions and be
expected to successfully complete it (or figure out that the system
didn’t support it)?

1 point

Completely!

Mostly. The task has some areas that are less clear or understandable, but most shoppers could figure it out.

Not very well. It would be hard for a shopper to understand what is being asked of him or her.

No description provided or there isn’t something a shopper could try to follow.

3.
Question 3
Is the task specific and concrete?

1 point

Yes, well done!

Mostly. A few minor issues, but generally concrete.

There are parts that are too vague to really interpret, though other parts seem concrete.

No description provided or this is too abstract and unclear to be at all useful.

4.
Question 4
Does the task include a clear statement of who is doing it?

1 point

Yes, who is clear. Note that this only needs to be enough background to assess if someone is a good fit.

Who isn’t clear in the text, though someone with clear knowledge of online shopping could probably figure it out.

Who isn’t specified at all.

5.
Question 5
Is the task described a complete job, not just a step that would not be performed in isolation.

1 point

Yes, the task makes sense as a reasonably complete thing someone might want to do.

The task is more of a sub-task that would never be done alone.

No meaningful task description submitted.

6.
Question 6
The task is reasonably central and important for the design of a shopping site or similar shopping interface.

1 point

Yes, this is a core, important step such that designing it poorly would hurt user experience substantially.

Mostly. This doesn’t seem like a core task, but it certainly valuable.

Not really. This is a task related to shopping, but it isn’t something important.

No meaningful task description submitted.

7.
Question 7
Does the task include any interface-dependent “implementation” items?
That is, does it tell “how” to accomplish it rather than just “what”
is to be accomplished.

1 point

No, there’s nothing interface-dependent. It is a pure task.

There are minor “how” elements, but it is mostly about “what.”

The task is rather specific about “how” — it would too much constrain or guide a user in the right way to accomplish it.

No meaningful task submitted.

8.
Question 8
Does the scenario identify a set of action steps that match the task?

1 point

Yes.

Not quite, but somewhat.

There are steps, but they don’t seem to match the task.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

9.
Question 9
Are the steps written in terms that a typical user (e.g., a Coursera learner) would understand and be able to carry out?

1 point

Yes.

Not quite, but somewhat.

No, they are not in terms that a user would understand.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

10.
Question 10
Does the scenario include information about “what” is being done, or just steps that indicate “how” to achieve it?

1 point

Just “how” steps.

Some “what” mixed in.

As much “what” as “how,” or maybe more.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

11.
Question 11
As far as you can tell, is the action sequence reasonably correct?

1 point

Yes.

Mostly.

I don’t think so.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

 

 

Task/Scenario Evaluation #2

 

1.
Question 1
OK, this is your second “training evaluation” of a Task and Scenario Description. First things first, please be sure you have Sample Task and Scenario #2 open (in another tab or window) as you complete this quiz.

Does the response contain a task-description for a task that would
make sense when considering what a smart watch user might want or need to do ?

1 point

Yes

No

2.
Question 2
To what extent is the task described clearly in a way that a user of
a smartwatch could be given it as instructions and be
expected to successfully complete it (or figure out that the system
didn’t support it)?

1 point

Completely!

Mostly. The task has some areas that are less clear or understandable, but most learners could figure it out.

Not very well. It would be hard for a learner to understand what is being asked of him or her.

No description provided or there isn’t something a learner could try to follow.

3.
Question 3
Is the task specific and concrete?

1 point

Yes, well done!

Mostly. A few minor issues, but generally concrete.

There are parts that are too vague to really interpret, though other parts seem concrete.

No description provided or this is too abstract and unclear to be at all useful.

4.
Question 4
Does the task include a clear statement of who is doing it?

1 point

Yes, who is clear. Note that this only needs to be enough background to assess if someone is a good fit.

Who isn’t clear in the text, though someone with clear knowledge of smart watches could probably figure it out.

Who isn’t specified at all.

5.
Question 5
Is the task describing a complete job, not just a step that would not be performed in isolation?

1 point

Yes, the task makes sense as a reasonably complete thing someone might want to do.

The task is more of a sub-task that would never be done alone.

No meaningful task description submitted.

6.
Question 6
The task is reasonably central and important for the design of a smart watch or similar device.

1 point

Yes, this is a core, important step such that designing it poorly would hurt user experience substantially.

Mostly. This doesn’t seem like a core task, but it certainly valuable.

Not really. This is a task related to a smart watch, but it isn’t something important.

No meaningful task description submitted.

7.
Question 7
Does the task include any interface-dependent “implementation” items?
That is, does it tell “how” to accomplish it rather than just “what”
is to be accomplished.

1 point

No, there’s nothing interface-dependent. It is a pure task.

There are minor “how” elements, but it is mostly about “what.”

The task is rather specific about “how” — it would too much constrain or guide a user in the right way to accomplish it.

No meaningful task submitted.

8.
Question 8
Does the scenario identify a set of action steps that match the task?

1 point

Yes.

Not quite, but somewhat.

There are steps, but they don’t seem to match the task.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

9.
Question 9
Are the steps written in terms that a typical user (e.g., a smart watch user) would understand and be able to carry out?

1 point

Yes.

Not quite, but somewhat.

No, they are not in terms that a user would understand.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

10.
Question 10
Does the scenario include information about “what” is being done, or just steps that indicate “how” to achieve it?

1 point

Just “how” steps.

Some “what” mixed in.

As much “what” as “how,” or maybe more.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

11.
Question 11
As far as you can tell, is the action sequence reasonably correct?

1 point

Yes.

Mostly.

I don’t think so.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

 

 

Task/Scenario Evaluation #3

 

1.
Question 1
OK, this is your final “training evaluation” of a Task and Scenario Description. First things first, please be sure you have Sample Task and Scenario #3 open (in another tab or window) as you complete this quiz.

Does the response contain a task-description for a task that would
make sense when considering what a learner might want or need to do in a
calendar program?

1 point

Yes

No

2.
Question 2
To what extent is the task described clearly in a way that a user of
a calendar could be given it as instructions and be
expected to successfully complete it (or figure out that the system
didn’t support it)?

1 point

Completely!

Mostly. The task has some areas that are less clear or understandable, but most calendar users could figure it out.

Not very well. It would be hard for a user to understand what is being asked of him or her.

No description provided or there isn’t something a user could try to follow.

3.
Question 3
Is the task specific and concrete?

1 point

Yes, well done!

Mostly. A few minor issues, but generally concrete.

There are parts that are too vague to really interpret, though other parts seem concrete.

No description provided or this is too abstract and unclear to be at all useful.

4.
Question 4
Does the task include a clear statement of who is doing it?

1 point

Yes, who is clear. Note that this only needs to be enough background to assess if someone is a good fit.

Who isn’t clear in the text, though someone with clear knowledge of calendars could probably figure it out.

Who isn’t specified at all.

5.
Question 5
Is the task described a complete job, not just a step that would not be performed in isolation.

1 point

Yes, the task makes sense as a reasonably complete thing someone might want to do.

The task is more of a sub-task that would never be done alone.

No meaningful task description submitted.

6.
Question 6
The task is reasonably central and important for the design of a calendar system.

1 point

Yes, this is a core, important step such that designing it poorly would hurt user experience substantially.

Mostly. This doesn’t seem like a core task, but it certainly valuable.

Not really. This is a task related to a calendar, but it isn’t something important.

No meaningful task description submitted.

7.
Question 7
Does the task include any interface-dependent “implementation” items?
That is, does it tell “how” to accomplish it rather than just “what”
is to be accomplished.

1 point

No, there’s nothing interface-dependent. It is a pure task.

There are minor “how” elements, but it is mostly about “what.”

The task is rather specific about “how” — it would too much constrain or guide a user in the right way to accomplish it.

No meaningful task submitted.

8.
Question 8
Does the scenario identify a set of action steps that match the task?

1 point

Yes.

Not quite, but somewhat.

There are steps, but they don’t seem to match the task.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

9.
Question 9
Are the steps written in terms that a typical user (e.g., a Coursera learner) would understand and be able to carry out?

1 point

Yes.

Not quite, but somewhat.

No, they are not in terms that a user would understand.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

10.
Question 10
Does the scenario include information about “what” is being done, or just steps that indicate “how” to achieve it?

1 point

Just “how” steps.

Some “what” mixed in.

As much “what” as “how,” or maybe more.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

11.
Question 11
As far as you can tell, is the action sequence reasonably correct?

1 point

Yes.

Mostly.

I don’t think so.

No meaningful scenario submitted.

 

Peer-graded Assignment: Task and Walkthrough Scenario Assignment

 

Click Here To Download

 

Intro to UI Design: UI Design Process

 

1.
Question 1
You are asked to design a system to support the social workers in a non-profit focused on helping low-income families, but you know very little about this context. What is the most important question to answer with formative work before beginning to design?

1 point

  • What technology do the users say they want?
  • Do these users tend to use iOS or Android products?
  • How technically literate are your users?
  • Who are the target users, in terms of their challenges, strategies, and values?

2.
Question 2

You are trying to design a system to support social workers in scheduling home visits with low-income families and have a fairly good idea about this context and users from your previous formative work. What is the most important question to answer before committing to specific technology solution?

1 point

  • When do the users get confused or make errors with each of your proposed solutions?
  • Who are your target users?
  • What is the best visual design for your interface?
  • What are the key challenges your solutions must address and key constraints to which it must adhere?

3.
Question 3

Which of the following is true about “critique” as a design-centered approach? (Select all that apply)

1 point

  • A critique-driven discussion assumes that the participants are trained experts who have developed good intuitions through years of work.
  • A critique involves asking users to use and provide feedback on your interface.
  • It is an important component of intellectual rigor in design-centered approaches.
  • A critique is a structured discussion of design ideas with a team of experts.

4.
Question 4

Which of the following best describes the “Cultural Probes” design method when done correctly?

1 point

 

  • The probes will tell you what to build next.
  • Cultural probes must always include a camera, a recorder, and a notebook.
  • The probes focus on initiating a rich dialogue, inspiring, and challenging assumptions.
  • The probes are sufficient to gather data without specific prompts.

5.
Question 5

Which of the following statements are true about the “Participatory Design” method when it is done correctly? (Select all that apply)

1 point

  • Design partners should be included at multiple stages of the process: formative work, design, and evaluation.
  • The primary role of users in a participatory design process is as sources for formative data for the design team.
  • Participatory design is best described as a process where an interdisciplinary team (e.g., designer, programmers, and business person) participate together in creating a good system for users.
  • In participatory design, ideas from users should be interpreted and implemented literally, because users have the best understanding of their context.

6.
Question 6

Which of the following statements is true about “Value Sensitive Design” (VSD) when done correctly?

1 point

  • VSD is best applied as a way to evaluate a final design once it is implemented, in order to understand whether that solution matches the values of the intended users.
  • In VSD, the designer must use the specific methods of contextual inquiry and envisioning cards to consider values.
  • VSD focuses on practical values that deal with getting tasks done quickly, such as efficiency and collaboration.
  • VSD supports the designer in considering how technical systems may support or violate human values.

7.
Question 7

You are a novice designer tasked with creating a web-based user interface for course registration at a university. College students using the system generally already know which courses they want to take and will want to complete the registration task quickly and efficiently. Which of the following approaches is most reasonable and why?

1 point

  • A design-centered approach, because this is a case where motivation, affect, and values are most important to this system’s success.
  • A task-centered user interface design (TCUID) approach, because this problem can be described as a series of tasks and TCUID provides a clear set of steps and artifacts for creating a reasonable task-centered interface.
  • A design-centered approach, because it is the approach best suited to structured tasks and this approach provides a lot of structure for novice designers.
  • A task-centered user interface design (TCUID) approach, because it is the only valid and rigorous approach to user-interface design.

8.
Question 8
Which of the following statements accurately describe personas?

1 point

  • Each product or interface needs exactly one persona
  • They are based on research
  • They are used as part of the design process
  • Each persona describes an individual who was studied in the research

9.
Question 9
In the case study on improving an existing solution, we heard about why the MovieLens system interface was updated. Three of the following were reasons for making these updates — which one was not a reason?

1 point

  • Many of the prominent interface features were not being used
  • The new user experience was too complex
  • The old interface took too much CPU time
  • Users complained that the interface felt dated

10.
Question 10
All of the design processes we discuss have three core elements. Which of the following is not one of those core elements?

1 point

  • User Research
  • Formal Specification
  • Design and Prototyping
  • Evaluation

11.
Question 11
Usability engineering has a focus on iteratively designing, evaluating, and re-designing. What is the insight behind this process?

1 point

  • That it is easier to improve an interface design than to get it right the first time
  • That user interface design has to be iterative because users make use of the interfaces over and over again.
  • That there is a limit to how much design you can do before the design starts getting worse.
  • That designers and developers get bored if they work too long without switching to another task.

12.
Question 12
Which of the following artifacts is this:

“John’s boss tells him about a new course on user interface design on Coursera, offered by a team of faculty at the University of Minnesota. She asks him to look into the course and find out how long it would take to complete and whether John has the background needed to take it.”

1 point

  • A persona
  • A task description
  • A walkthrough scenario
  • None of the above

 

 

Week- 3

Peer-graded Assignment: Interface Critique

 

Click Here To Download

 

Week- 4

Intro to UI Design: Psychology and Human Factors: Shortcuts to Understanding Your Users

 

1.
Question 1
Which of the following are true statements about short-term memory and long-term memory?

1 point

Short-term memory can hold only a small amount of information, while long-term memory can hold an indefinite amount of information.

The recalling of short-term memory is slower than long-term memory.

Short-term memory can hold information for a short period of time, while long-term memory can hold information information for a long time.

Interface design should avoid heavily relying on users’ short-term memory and long-term memory.

2.
Question 2
Which of the following describe the characteristics of human perception?

1 point

People respond very differently to the same shape in different sizes.

Human eyes and mind see objects as belonging together if they are near each other in space.

Human perception is stable and is not influenced by expectancies.

Context, environment, and surroundings influence individual perception.

3.
Question 3
Which of the following principles prevent slips?

1 point

Good interface design should not forgive slips.

Good interface design should offer suggestions to users.

Good interface design should choose good defaults.

Good interface design should include helpful constraints.

4.
Question 4

We learned that people have an innate tendency to build models of systems they use. Which of the following statements best describes the relationship between the Design Model of a system, the User Model of the system, and the System Image?

1 point

 

Designers should be explicit about their understanding of the system (the Design Model), then create an interface whose look and functionality (the System Image) helps users create a model (the User Model) identical to the Designer Model.

 

 

After designing the the look and functionality of a system (the System Image), the designers should write documentation describing how it works (the Design Model) so users can understand it (the User Model).

 

 

Once designers have figured out how they want the system to work (the Design Model) and how users understand the system (User Model), it is easy to create an appropriate user interface (the System Image).

 

 

Designers should do studies to understand Users’ Models of the system they are creating, create a Design Model consistent with it, then develop an attractive System Image using good design principle.

5.
Question 5
An email program I use puts the messages I send in the Sent Items folder and replies to my messages in the Inbox folder. I’m wondering whether I received a reply to one of my messages, but it’s hard for me to tell. Which of the following design concepts apply to this situation?

1 point

 

Gulf of Evaluation

 

 

Constraints

 

 

Gulf of Execution

 

 

Mappings

6.
Question 6
You’re working on a website that allows instructors to enter grades for their classes. You begin to hear reports from instructors who can’t find the link to change a student’s grade after final grades have been reported. You think to yourself: “This is an example of ______”.

1 point

 

The Gulf of Execution

 

 

Excessive memory load

 

 

The Gulf of Evaluation

 

 

Poor Mappings

7.
Question 7

As I drag a file item from one folder to another in Windows 10, the interface creates a small thumbnail image of the file contents and attaches it to the cursor as I move it. I think: “Wow, this is a great example of ______”:

1 point

 

Constraints

 

 

Mappings

 

 

Feedback

 

Fitt’s Law

8.
Question 8
I’m filling out an online application form for a new United States passport. I am prompted to enter the state I live in, and I have to choose from a drop-down list that contains only the 50 states of the US. This is a good use of the design principle: _____

1 point

 

Mappings

 

 

Feedback

 

 

Attention

 

 

Constraints

9.
Question 9
Your job is to explain the design principle of Mapping to someone by giving them an example. Which of the following best illustrates this principle?

1 point

Pebble smart watches have three buttons on the side. Pressing the one on the top lets you navigate up through a list of notifications and pressing the one on the bottom lets you navigate down through the list.

The Yelp website makes it really clear what the intended purpose of the site is: to find reviews of local businesses, especially of restaurants.

Google’s Material Design specification say that the Navigation Drawer — which contains the navigation destinations for the app — slides in from the left and can be accessed by swiping in from the left side of the screen.

The Netflix app features images of shows you can watch, which can help remind you of what the shows are about and who is in them, which makes it easy for you to decide if you want to watch a show or not.

10.
Question 10
Why is it that mining results from social science research can help design socio-technical systems?

1 point

Social psychology, economics, organizational behavior, and other various branches of social science offer theories to help us better understand individual motivation and human behavior in social settings.

The social science theories can be used to predict people’s behavior in social settings, and therefore inform design choices about how to build a successful socio-technical system.

Social psychology is science.

People’s behavior is unpredictable.

11.
Question 11
Which of the following is a reasonable explanation of “application” power of an HCI theory?

1 point

Theory provides a conceptual framework for making sense of the world.

Theory can be applied to make predictions about phenomena

Theory can help describe phenomena to communicate about them.

Theory informs and guides system design.

12.
Question 12
Which of the following is a true statement about Distributed Cognition?

1 point

Distributed Cognition privileges people (e.g., users) over objects (e.g., devices).

The unit of analysis is an activity that transforms an object into an outcome.

It emphasizes that people only develop plans when an activity becomes problematic.

It focuses on how information and thought can be embedded in objects and actions.

 

 

 

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *