Uncategorized

Positive Psychology Quiz

Positive Psychology Quiz Answer. In this post you will get Quiz Answer Of Positive Psychology Quiz

 

Positive Psychology Quiz

Offered By ”The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill”

Enroll Now

Week 1 Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
Which of the following statements is true about emotions?

1 point

A. Emotions are embodied. That is, they affect bodily processes like our heart rate, muscle tension and posture.

B. The emotion a person experiences within a certain situation depends on how he or she interprets the situation.

C. All people experience emotions in the exact same way

D. Only A and B are true.

2.
Question 2
What is negativity bias?

1 point

A. A feeling of negativity towards all new information

B. An unfair expression of prejudice or unfairness toward someone or something.

C. The tendency to attach more weight to negative events than to positive events.

D. The tendency to attach more weight to positive events than to negative events.

3.
Question 3
This week, we learned about 10 specific positive emotions. Which of the following statements is true about these specific positive emotions?

1 point

A. One action tendency associated with contentment (also known as serenity) is the urge to give back to someone else.

B. When people experience the positive emotion called interest, they tend to become playful.

C. Hope is a positive emotion that tends to occur in circumstances that are not positive at all.

D. The emotion of joy creates the tendency to dream big and motivates people toward achieving more.

4.
Question 4
Emotions tend to generate an action urge, or in other words, they make us want to do something or behave in a particular way. Which of the following is true for about action urges?

1 point

A. Positive emotions motivate us to have one specific action urge, whereas negative emotions motivate us to be more open and have multiple action urges.

B. Negative emotions motivate us to have one or two specific action urges, while positive emotions motivate us to be more open and have multiple action urges.

C. Both positive and negative emotions tend to generate a similar number of action urges.

D. Positive emotions typically generate an action urge to help us solve an immediate problem, like the urge to flee from a threatening situation.

5.
Question 5
This week, you read about the undoing hypothesis in an article titled “The Value of Positive Emotions.” Which of the following is false about the undoing hypothesis?

1 point

A. Positive emotions ‘undo’ the lingering effects of negative emotions.

B. Positive emotions speed cardiovascular recovery following a negative emotional experience.

C. Positive emotions are thought to loosen the hold that negative emotions gain on the mind and body and dismantle preparation of specific action urges.

D. Positive emotions undo cognitive broadening, thus helping individuals to narrow their focus toward their positive feelings.

 

 

Week 2 Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
Which of the following is not true about the broadened awareness that comes from positive emotions?

1 point

A. Positive emotions expand people’s ideas about what they’d like to do next.

B. Positive emotions get people to see things from a more “big picture” and global perspective.

C. Positive emotions get people to see things from a more detailed, local perspective.

2.
Question 2
Positive emotions can lead to increases in key resources in people’s lives. Which of the following is not a resource that has been shown to be ‘built’ by positive emotions?

1 point

A. Mental resources (e.g., ability to be mindful)

B. Social resources (e.g., feelings of connection with others)

C. Psychological resources (e.g., resilience, mastery of difficult situations)

D. Self-defense resources (e.g., increased attention to threatening situations)

3.
Question 3
Which of the following best describes how resilient people differ from others in the way that they respond to stressful situations?

1 point

A. They rebound and recover from stress more quickly.

B. They worry less about future uncertain negative situations.

C. They experience negative emotions less frequently.

D. Both A and B are true

4.
Question 4
Like pleasures, positive emotions feel good. Which of the following statements best describes how positive emotions and pleasures differ?

1 point

A. Unlike positive emotions, pleasures tell us not just what our body needs, but what we need mentally and emotionally.

B. Positive emotions are triggered by how we interpret our current circumstances, whereas pleasures are the result of giving the body what it needs in that particular moment.

C. Pleasures are triggered by how we interpret our current circumstances, whereas positive emotions are the result of giving the body what it needs in that particular moment.

D. Pleasures broaden our minds in that particular moment, whereas positive emotions help us to build resources in the long-term.

5.
Question 5
Research shows that learning how to self-generate positive emotions creates a cascade of benefits in people’s lives. Select the order of this cascade effect that best represents the research results described in this week’s lessons.

1 point

A. increases in positive emotions → increase life satisfaction → build resources

B. increases in positive emotions → build resources → increase life satisfaction

C. build resources → increases in life satisfaction → increases in positive emotions

D. increases in life satisfaction → increases in positive emotions → build resources

 

 

Week 3 Quiz

1.
Question 1
Which of the following describes an ineffective way to pursue happiness in your life?

1 point

A. Avoid experiencing negative emotions

B. Maximize physical pleasures is your life

C. Force yourself to feel positive emotions in every situation

D. All of the above are ineffective ways to pursue happiness

2.
Question 2
What is a more effective way to bring positive emotions into your daily life?

1 point

A. Focus on your current circumstances and prioritize parts of your day where you might experience positive emotions

B. Think about what situations have made you happy in the past and try to make it a priority for you to experience that type of situation again in the future

C. Focus on your feeling states and try to change how positive you currently feel

D. Both A and B

3.
Question 3
What are some of the good outcomes associated with prioritizing positivity?

1 point

A. Higher life satisfaction

B. The ability to build better relationships

C. Reduced depressive symptoms

D. All of the above

4.
Question 4
Which ratio of positive to negative emotions has been linked to flourishing mental health?

1 point

A. Equal amounts of positive and negative emotions

B. Two positive emotions for every one negative emotion

C. Three or more positive emotions for every one negative emotion

D. The exact ratio doesn’t matter as long as the positive emotions are felt more intensely than the negative emotions

5.
Question 5
This week, you watched an interview with Darren Coppin about how he uses positive psychology to help individuals who are unemployed. Based on what you learned from this video, which of the following statements is true?

1 point

A. The levels of anxiety, stress and depression among the unemployed are similar to the levels of soldiers returning from duty

B. Stress can lead to excessive narrow-mindedness and make it difficult for individuals to overcome challenges in life

C. Experiencing frequent negativity can become a habit in the same way that positive emotions can become a habit

D. All of the above statements are true

 

 

Week 4 Quiz

1.
Question 1
This week, Dr. Fredrickson shared some characteristics of love from an emotion science perspective. According to this perspective, which of the following statements are true about love?

1 point

A. Love is unconditional.

B. Love is a long-lasting bond between two people.

C. Love is a momentary feeling that is dynamic and changing.

D. All of the above statements are true.

2.
Question 2
Which of the statements below describes the purpose of smiles?

1 point

A. To express positivity to others and evoke positivity from others.

B. To collectively broaden mindsets and build resources among groups of people.

C. To create moments of positivity resonance which ultimately serve as a nutrient to our health and wellbeing.

D. All of the above.

3.
Question 3
This week, you engaged in a guided loving-kindness meditation. Based on the material you encountered this week, which of the following statements is true about the practice of loving-kindness meditation?

1 point

A. When practicing loving-kindness meditation, your actual feelings matter more than your intentions. If you do not feel loving or kind, you’re probably doing the practice wrong.

B. Loving-kindness should be focused outward toward others and not inward, toward oneself.

C. The goal of loving-kindness meditation is entirely about self-affirmation and self-compassion.

D. When practicing loving-kindness meditation, start by sending well wishes to someone who you naturally feel positive toward and then try to extend those warm feelings to others.

4.
Question 4
Which of the following is a component of positivity resonance?

1 point

A. Shared positive emotions.

B. Mutual care and concern.

C. Biobehavioral synchrony.

D. All of the above are components of positivity resonance.

5.
Question 5
Based on Angela Winter’s interview with Dr. Fredrickson, which of the following is false about how love affects the body physically?

1 point

A. Oxytocin, a neuropeptide associated with love and intimacy, is released and makes us more attuned to and influenced by others.

B. Vagal tone, which is assessed by the degree to which your breathing affects your heart rate, can predict the degree to which people find social interactions enjoyable.

C. Having a lack of positive social connections can be just as damaging to your health as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, or being obese.

D. The only way love affects the body physically is through sexual activity.

 

 

Week 5 Quiz

1.
Question 1
Which of the following relationships is NOT a component of the upward spiral connection between positive emotions and cardiac vagal tone?

1 point

a. The more people experience positive emotions, the more people feel connected and attuned with others.

b. Increases in the extent to which people feel connected and attuned with others predicts increases cardiac vagal tone.

c. The more people experience positive emotions, the more they meditate.

d. Higher initial levels of cardiac vagal tone predict the extent to which people experience positive emotions in response to meditation.

2.
Question 2
Suppose you have one of the many chronic illnesses that comes with chronic inflammation. What can you conclude about your past experiences of positive emotions?

1 point

a. You’ve had insufficient nourishment from positive emotions.

b. Your positivity ratio must have been too low.

c. Your positivity ratio must have been too high.

d. Nothing at all. It’s a logical fallacy to make any inference at all about your past experiences of emotions from a current health condition. Illness is multiply determined.

3.
Question 3
Which of the following statements is true about how emotions impact the immune system?

1 point

a. Our emotions appear to alert our immune system about which types of immune-related threats are most likely to occur given the circumstances, thus enabling our body to prepare for these threats.

b. Emotions cannot change our DNA, but appear to change the way our DNA gets expressed into the cells that make up our immune system and our body.

c. Our immune system is biologically determined and cannot be shaped by emotions.

d. Both A and B are true.

4.
Question 4
How do our daily habits of social interactions impact our body’s biological capacity to socially connect?

1 point

a. Daily social interactions deplete our body’s “social connection muscle” and weaken our body’s biological capacity to socially connect.

b. Daily social interaction habits strengthen our “social connection muscle”, which permanently improves our body’s biological capacity to socially connect.

c. Daily social interaction habits strengthen our “social connection muscle”, which improves our body’s biological capacity to socially connect as long as we continue to exercise this “muscle”.

d. Social interaction habits do not have any impact on our body’s ability to socially engage.

5.
Question 5
This week, you read an essay by Dr. Fredrickson titled “Your Phone vs. Your Heart.” Based on this essay, which of the following statements best describe why it is important to take our eyes away from our digital screens and engage in face-to-face interactions?

1 point

a. Face-to-face interactions enable greater synchrony and shared positivity between two people (e.g., shared smiles or laughs), which can ultimately improve your health and your capacity to empathize.

b. The more attuned to others we become, the healthier we become, and vice versa.

c. If we don’t regularly socially engage with others, our capacity for social connection withers.

d. All of the above statements were arguments made in this particular essay.

 

Week 6 Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
According to the study mentioned in this week’s video lecture, relationship satisfaction receives the greatest boost when expressions of gratitude are mostly focused on…

1 point

a. the person who did something kind for you.

b. the gifts you receive.

c. the way you feel.

d. None of the above

2.
Question 2
A new perspective in emotion science suggests that your discrete emotions (e.g., anger, fear, joy, gratitude, etc.) are constructed based on:

1 point

a. Feelings of pleasantness versus unpleasantness

b. Feelings of high energy versus low energy

c. Your appreciation of the meaning of your current circumstances, as informed by cultural believes and personal knowledge

d. All of the above, in combination

3.
Question 3
According to Dr. Fredrickson, why might it be helpful to understand the significance of micromoments of positivity in your life?

1 point

a. Realizing the significance of these micro-moments of positivity can help you tune your focus toward these types of moments and help them come alive.

b. Micro-moments of positivity can improve your own health.

c. Micro-moments of positivity can improve the health of others with whom you interact.

d. All of the above

4.
Question 4
In this week’s interview, Dr. Patrick Akos described his involvement with shaping the way schools counsel their adolescent students. Which of the following describes a goal of Patrick’s work?

1 point

a. Focus less on the pathology and deficits of students.

b. Focus more on enhancing the strengths of students.

c. Take advantage of the wide variety of “asset rich” environments within the school context (classrooms, peer groups, etc.) to counsel students.

d. All of the above

5.
Question 5
Which of the following statements is true about the way expectations relate to the way people experience micro-moments of positivity resonance?

1 point

a. People’s preexisting beliefs and expectations can shape their experiences of positivity resonance.

b. If people don’t see the value of micro-moments of positivity resonance, they might not notice when they encounter an opportunity for positive social connection.

c. Micro-moments of positivity resonance are biologically determined and so people’s expectations are unrelated to the experience of these moments.

d. Both A and B are true.

 

 

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *